C4C: Agility and Forgiveness

All about the role of agility and forgiveness in learning.

Continuing the Changes for Change series, here’s some thoughts on agility and forgiveness:

Agility is a combination of being able to respond quickly and flexibly in response to changes and new opportunities.

Forgiveness is a necessary companion to agility and is the acceptance and recovery from mistakes and failures.

Agility and forgiveness are very necessary teacher attitudes for the day-to-day function of an interactive classroom. One can’t (and shouldn’t) plan for every possibility, and so you have to be able to respond to new questions and directions that show up in class.  Even being agile, there will be times when things don’t work out as you had planned and even your adjustments can always correct things.  So, you need to be able to forgive yourself for you mistakes, promise to correct them (if necessary), and go on. I think preparing for being agile and forgiving consists of always looking for new ideas anjaslfasdlfjasldfjaslfdj

For my students, agility and forgiveness are probably the highest skills.  They should learn to plan and organize, but they should also be able to adapt.  This is especially true with respect to how they are applying themselves to the course.  Every assessment is an opportunity for them to evaluate the success of their study skills. I can play a role in this by asking them to reflect on the effectiveness of their preparation. This could also

I was reading an article in the local paper about a new program at my university1.   As part of this new program they included some cool feature (X). An administrator who was involved in the development on the program said (see the footnote again): “Students have asked for X for years and this shows how we respond to student input.”  The intent was to highlight student input, but it made me think about some other conversations I’ve had about whether or not our university or higher ed in general is can respond quickly to new ideas.

This is interesting because universities are always talking about being cutting edge, and of their important role in the economy for developing new ideas, yet, in practice we are pretty slow.  I’ve highlighted some examples below:

Publishing: It takes 1-5 years for an idea to go from creation/discovery to final publication through traditional means. High stakes results may come out quicker, at least between formal write-up and publication, and there are always informal pathways that are quicker, but overall it is a slow process.

Curriculum Change: 7 years (catalog life)

Forgiveness is an important companion, but is much harder to implement in a class. Forgiveness often means forgetting, which means redoing or substituting or just dropping. I think universities as a whole allow more forgiveness than the private sector, with repeat policies, second chances, and petitions. Individual faculty have some wiggle room for experimental attempts in the classroom and for unproductive research agendas.

For my classes, the next step for forgiveness is to move towards more standards-based or specification grading which rewards movement towards achievement and minimizes the consequences of failure. I’ll post more about specification grading later.

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1The details are going to be vague because I actually slightly misread the article and I don’t want to embarrass myself or the other people involved. The inspiration is valid, even if the details aren’t.

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